Grants for Projects Promoting Self-Sufficiency and Food Security in Low-Income Communities

Casey Hoy's picture

 

Eligible applicants:  NGO's with a track record of food system work, collaboration with academic, private, and public organizations is encouraged

Projects Promoting Self-Sufficiency and Food Security in Low-Income Communities - The USDA National Institute of Food and Agriculture (NIFA) is accepting grant funding applications for its program designed to "... (1): (A) meet the food needs of low-income people; (B) increase the self-reliance of communities in providing for their own food needs; and (C) promote comprehensive responses to local food, farm, and nutrition issues; and/or (2) meet specific state, local, or neighborhood food and agriculture needs for (A) infrastructure improvement and development; (B) planning for long-term solutions; or (C) the creation of innovative marketing activities that mutually benefit agricultural producers and low-income consumers ..." - NIFA anticipates having approximately $5,000,000 in total available grant funds for the program for fiscal year (FY) 2013.

Document Title: The title of the October 15, 2012 USDA NIFA Grant Funding Announcement is "Community Food Projects Competitive Grants Program"

Organization: USDA National Institute of Food and Agriculture (NIFA)

Source: October 15, 2012 USDA NIFA Grant Funding Announcement USDA-NIFA-CFP-003957

Applications Due By: November 28, 2012

Web site: The October 15, 2012 USDA NIFA Grant Funding Announcement is posted at 
http://www07.grants.gov/search/search.do?&mode=VIEW&oppId=204114

The 2013 Request for Applications is available at 
http://nifa.usda.gov/funding/rfas/community_food.html 
* Specifically at 
http://nifa.usda.gov/funding/rfas/pdfs/13_comm_foods_14.pdf

Additional information about NIFA's Community Food Projects is available at 
http://www.nifa.usda.gov/funding/cfp/cfp.html

Contact: Questions may be directed to the following individuals:

* Dr. Jane Clary who is the National Program Leader for the Community Food Projects Competitive Grants Program of the USDA National Institute of Food and Agriculture at 202 720 3891; fax: 202 720 9366; e-mail: JClary@NIFA.USDA.gov 
* Katrena R. Hanks who is a Program Specialist with the Community Food Projects Competitive Grants Program of the USDA National Institute of Food and Agriculture at 202 401 5286; fax: 202 401 4888; e-mail: KHanks@NIFA.USDA.gov

Summary: The following information is taken from the October 15, 2012 USDA NIFA 2013 Request for Applications (RFA):

B. Purpose and Priorities

The primary goals of the Community Food Projects Competitive Grants Program (CFPCGP) are to: 
* Meet the food needs of low-income individuals; 
* Increase the self-reliance of communities in providing for the food needs of the communities; 
* Promote comprehensive responses to local food, farm, and nutrition issues; and 
* Meet specific state, local or neighborhood food and agricultural needs including needs relating to: 
- Infrastructure improvement and development; 
- Planning for long-term solutions; or 
- The creation of innovative marketing activities that mutually benefit agricultural producers and low-income consumers.

Community Food Projects are intended to bring together stakeholders from the distinct parts of the food system and to foster understanding of national food security trends and how they might improve local food systems.

Applications are being solicited for the CFPCGP under the following areas:

In FY 2013 NIFA’s CFPGCP intends to solicit applications and fund two types of grants. The types are entitled (1) Community Food Projects (CFP), and (2) Planning Projects (PP).

The CFPCGP RFA directly aligns with the Research, Education, and Economics Action Plan (http://www.ree.usda.gov/ree/news/USDA_REE_Action _Plan_02-2012_2.pdf ) and specifically addresses Goal 4, Nutrition and Childhood Obesity by strengthening established strategic partnerships and strengthening implementation practices to encourage healthy eating and physical activity at the individual and community levels, focusing on high-risk groups.

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We really should learn how to

allanrich's picture

We really should learn how to be self sufficient again. Years ago people used to make a living just by producing everything they needed on their land, these days we depend too much on grocery stores. We could produce more fruits and vegetables instead of growing ornamental plants. Personally I can't do any of that since I don't live on a farm, but I like to buy milk produced locally. I plan to repair my frozen yogurt machine, I've already got anything I need from http://www.frozenyogurtparts.com/, and then I'll even be able to make my own frozen yogurt again. Little things like this will make a change eventually.